Smartly choosing your first job!

I have completed my studies, what shall I do now? I’m getting frustrated; There is no one to guide me; Shall I go for marketing or IT – all my friends are choosing these fields?“. Don’t these phrases sound very familiar when we meet fresh passouts, who are preparing to gain entry into the corporate world but lack clarity on which way to go?

Abundance of options makes the choice even difficult. How many of us could afford going to career counselors or had access to internet or could spend money asking for guidance? In fact, most of us never even think of doing proper evaluation and don’t realize it until we end up doing a non-satisfying job.

Here are some learnings based on my experience and interaction with various job seekers and professionals. This is just a guide and lot more depends on your taking an ‘educated and informed’ decision:

1. Set a mission statement for yourself: What I really want to do? Ask yourself these questions: What I really enjoy doing; what are my values; where do I want to see myself after 10 or 20 years: a helping person, a technical person, an entrepreneur, a sportsman? Check out http://www.6decisions.com for help on making your own mission statement.

2. Define your short and long-term goals: A path traveled without destination in mind takes you nowhere. Set a goal for yourself, you can revise and keep updating it as and when you become more aware of what you want and what you can do.

3. Job and skill set mapping: Make a list of the various jobs of your interest: travel, technology, counseling etc. Also list down your skill sets and do the mapping with the jobs of your interest. This will help you weigh down various possibilities and explore the job of your choice by helping you identify the gaps in your skill set that can be built up gradually or by undertaking some professional courses.

4. Analyze your strengths and weak areas: List down what are you good at, what are your strong points that can really help you in achieving your mission and goal. Also identify the things that you’re not good at but they are ‘required’ for the job you want to pursue. Do a proper SWOT analysis of yourself. You can do this exercise along with job mapping.

5. Identify personal training needs and required resources: Ones you’ve listed down the jobs of your interest and identified your strengths and weaknesses, identify your personal training needs. For example, you may wish to go for call center job, which requires good communication skills but poor communication skills is one of your weak areas.

Find out ways of how can you improve your communication skills before you go for the interview. You may enroll yourself for a communication training or join a call center as a fresher that provides you training, do regular reading to improve your vocabulary etc.

6. Look out for various options: Be open to look for multiple opportunities that suit your interests and the skills you possess so that you have a backup plan. For example, if you are interested in a job that involves guiding and educating people, you may apply for a teaching job. However, if that doesn’t work well for you, you can keep preparing yourself for a counseling or any similar job.

7. Gain experience, do free lancing: If you are not yet prepared to take up a full time job, you can do some freelancing or join a group with your friends having similar interests and apply your knowledge practically. Work on small projects that you can always showcase in your resume or join relevant trainings so that you’re better equipped than others and can grab a good opportunity that comes your way.

8. Be optimistic: It’s very easy to get frustrated when efforts and search do not pay soon. Take time, be calm and do some stress relieving activities like pursuing your hobbies, adding more value to yourself by undergoing relevant trainings. Most importantly, keep trying. The more you explore, more aware and knowledgeable you become of the field of your interest which is always helpful even during the job. Take any decision with a calmed mind as it’s extremely important to enjoy the work that you’re doing to be satisfied and successful at the end.

9. Networking: Networking is a key thing that helps build you more contacts. Join networking sites, various groups related to the field of your choice and gain more information and exchange your perspectives. Talk to people working in those fields to understand the hidden realities behind a rosy picture. This will help you make a realistic decision.

10. Read books: Most of us would raise our eyebrows on this suggestion, however books definitely help gain more knowledge and broaden our perspectives about ourselves, career, society, world etc., making us a better human being and ultimately leading to better decision making.

So get ahead and make a smart move!

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Personal SWOT

Most of us are quite apprehensive when asked to present our SWOT analysis at interviews and I’ve personally met so many people who don’t know what SWOT is. They get stuck on this during interviews.

Here are few excerpts from my original article on personal SWOT that was published on rediff [http://in.rediff.com/getahead/2006/sep/08swot.htm]

Coined by the military, SWOT stands for ‘Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats’. It aims to identify strengths, improve on weaknesses, utilise opportunities and minimize weaknesses.

Various forms of SWOT question during interviews:

1. Can you highlight some of your strengths and weaknesses?

2. Can you present your SWOT Analysis?

3. Why should we hire you and what are your areas of development / improvement? What opportunities do you foresee for yourself in this job?

4. What threats can you identify in the job we’re offering and how do you think you can tackle them?

What experts say

SWOT is a very helpful tool for HR executives in assessing potential candidates. “Those who know their weaknesses and can openly express themselves through SWOT, have been observed to be able to adjust well in an open work culture. They are firm believers of candour in the workplace and appreciate open feedback for smooth running of an organization. SWOT helps in understanding the career aspirations of an individual and assessing how far he or she is willing to go with the organisation,” says Shikha Kumar, HR Manager, ISHIR Infotech.

<For more expert quotes, refer to my original article on rediff>

Do some homework before you appear for the interview:

. Have participatory sessions with your friends to know more of your strengths and weaknesses.

. List down all your strengths and weaknesses.

. Explore the prospective job/employer/company to identify opportunities.

. Gain more knowledge about the industry to detect threats.

Handling SWOT at interviews

Before the interview, ensure your resume maps to what you might talk about. It should also highlight your strengths.

1. Strengths: Positives you can capitalise on, these should be your ‘key selling points.’

Think of what makes you special. What influences and motivates you? What are your attributes for success? What key traits do you have? You can talk about your personal characteristics here like: Good analytical skills, determination, persistence, etc.

Examples of strengths:
a. Very confident and assertive.
b. Good communication skills.

What the interviewer ‘buys’ is ‘how are these strengths helping in the job he has to offer’ and ‘what is the value they add to the job’. For example, while appearing for a sales job interview, the following strengths can be highlighted:

a. I am very confident and assertive in whatever I do. I have been able to leverage customer service by converting unhappy customers to loyal customers by understanding their problems, educating them, giving them confidence and being able to solve their problems.

b. I have been involved in company presentations and workshops, and have been imparting training. My communication skills help me stand up and put forward my views in front of a group of people.

c. Having worked in customer service for two years, I have good customer service skills and customer relations.

2. Weaknesses: Negative areas you need to improve on.

This is the toughest aspect to think of and share with your future/potential company. Also, this is one area where your answers need to be more diplomatic. Avoid hinting at something that may impact the job execution in your potential company. We all know and admit that no one is perfect. Do not say ‘I don’t have any weakness’. Be realistic and show that you realize and are well aware of your weaknesses. Give confidence to your prospective employer that your weaknesses are not going to hamper your job.

Examples of weaknesses:
a. I sometimes tend to get into too many details that delay execution.
b. I can’t say ‘No’ if someone asks me for help with some work.

Never highlight personal weaknesses like ‘being emotional’, ‘short tempered’ etc.

3. Opportunities: Positive external conditions you can take advantage of.

Talk about various opportunities you foresee in that prospective job. This will show your interest and reflect a positive attitude.

Examples of opportunities:
a. While working with international customers, I may have the opportunity to learn new cultures; newer ways of working that will further help me to provide customised and better services to my customers.
b. By imparting training, I will be able to improve my confidence level and presentation skills.

4. Threats: Negative external conditions you can’t control but can minimize.

There are threats we all face at our workplaces, but we need to know how to survive with them. While talking about ‘threats’, try to foresee the ones you may face at your prospective job.

Examples of threats:
a. Competition for the job I want.
b. Overworking myself by taking on so many responsibilities.
c. Changing job requirements of the field.

Also suggest certain ways you may minimise these threats. For example:
a. Getting trained on certain skills to survive competition for the job.
b. Trying time management to avoid getting overworked.
c. Upgrading my technical skills and proficiencies and keeping abreast of industry changes to cope up with job requirements.

Take away points

. Map your STRENGTHS to your prospective job.

. Avoid hinting at WEAKNESSES that may have a negative impact on your prospective job. Also try to present an improvement plan that you have to overcome these weaknesses.

. Identify OPPORTUNITIES in the prospective job and mention how these can be advantageous to you and help in performing the job better.

. Detect THREATS and present ways to minimise them.